Every student wants to start the new school year looking and feeling their best.

 
You certainly don't want to be struggling with acne or another chronic skin condition.


dermatologist-on-call-logo-2016.png

ge-bts2017-lp-banner.png


Every student wants to start the new school year looking and feeling their best.


You certainly don't want to be struggling with acne or another chronic skin condition.

ge-start-visit-button.png


What are common skin conditions among kids and teens?

lp-divide-image-1910x700-mom-son.png
Acne
By mid-teens, more than 40% of kids have acne or scars from acne that need to be treated by a dermatologist according to the American Academy of Dermatology.

Eczema
According to the National Eczema Association, as many as 10% of all infants have some form of eczema. While there is no cure for eczema, about half of children who suffer from it outgrow it by the time they become an adult.

Lice
According to the American Academy of Dermatology, 6 to 12 million children between 3 and 12 years of age get head lice each year. Lice spread from head-to-head contact with someone who has lice. Commonly, lice are spread through schools and sports teams.

Warts
According to the American Academy of Dermatology, warts are benign (non-cancerous) skin growths that appear when a virus infects the top layer of the skin. Children and teens are more prone to getting a wart virus because it is quite easy to catch a virus when you have a cut or scrape on your skin.

Sunburn
Too much exposure from ultraviolet rays can cause long-lasting damage to the skin. This damage increases a person's risk of getting skin cancer. In fact, sustaining five or more sunburns in youth increases lifetime melanoma (the deadliest form of skin cancer) risk by 80%, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation.


Get quick and convenient access to professional dermatology care.

The weeks leading up to the start of the new school year can be incredibly busy for parents and students with families squeezing in last-minute getaways and vacations and as athletics and other extracurricular activities resume and college students prepare to move back to campus. Finding time to get to a doctor's office can be challenging.

Consider conducting a visit with a dermatologist online. It only takes about 10 minutes and can be done anytime and from anywhere.

ge-start-visit-button.png



Choose your doctor from our network of U.S. board-certified dermatologists.

lp-divide-image-1910x700-mom-daughter.png
Through your phone, tablet or computer, you have quick and easy access to a U.S. board-certified dermatologist licensed in our state when it's convenient for you. You get a diagnosis and treatment plan - as well as any necessary prescriptions sent to your pharmacy - usually in less than 24 hours.

Then, you are on your way to clear, healthy skin and a great start to the new school year!

How does it work?


ge-start-visit-button.png
Acne
By mid-teens, more than 40% of kids have acne or scars from acne that need to be treated by a dermatologist according to the American Academy of Dermatology.

Eczema
According to the National Eczema Association, as many as 10% of all infants have some form of eczema. While there is no cure for eczema, about half of children who suffer from it outgrow it by the time they become an adult.

Lice
According to the American Academy of Dermatology, 6 to 12 million children between 3 and 12 years of age get head lice each year. Lice spread from head-to-head contact with someone who has lice. Commonly, lice are spread through schools and sports teams.

Warts
According to the American Academy of Dermatology, warts are benign (non-cancerous) skin growths that appear when a virus infects the top layer of the skin. Children and teens are more prone to getting a wart virus because it is quite easy to catch a virus when you have a cut or scrape on your skin.

Sunburn
Too much exposure from ultraviolet rays can cause long-lasting damage to the skin. This damage increases a person's risk of getting skin cancer. In fact, sustaining five or more sunburns in youth increases lifetime melanoma (the deadliest form of skin cancer) risk by 80%, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation.

ge-bts2017-lp-banner.png
DOC logo.png
What are common skin conditions among kids and teens?
Through your phone, tablet or computer, you have quick and easy access to a U.S. board-certified dermatologist licensed in your state when it's convenient for you. You get a diagnosis and treatment plan - as well as any necessary prescriptions sent to your pharmacy - usually in less than 24 hours. 

Then, you are on your way to clear, healthy skin and a great start to the new school year!


  
ge-bts-2017-package-ad.png


Get quick and convenient access to professional dermatology care.

The weeks leading up to the start of the new school year can be incredibly busy for parents and students with families squeezing in last-minute getaways and vacations and as athletics and other extracurricular activities resume and college students prepare to move back to campus. Finding time to get to a doctor's office can be challenging.

Consider conducting a visit with a dermatologist online. It only takes about 10 minutes and can be done anytime and from anywhere.

ge-start-visit-button.png


Choose your doctor from our network of U.S. board-certified dermatologists.